ARCHIVED - Chapter 5

WarningThis page has been archived.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.



Table of Contents

A highly delegated staffing system

5.1 The Public Service Commission (PSC) continues to articulate the authorities it delegates to deputy heads in its Appointment Delegation and Accountability Instrument (ADAI). This instrument is the formal document by which the PSC delegates its authorities to deputy heads. It identifies authorities, any conditions related to the delegation and sub-delegation of these authorities and how deputy heads will be held accountable for them.

5.2 As of March 31, 2008, 82 ADAIs were in effect between the PSC and deputy heads. The deputy heads were in a position to exercise the delegated authorities of the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA) according to the conditions prescribed by the ADAI. These organizations included 188 160 employees and an additional 7 477 casual workers. This represented a growth of 4.1% over the previous year. The number of casual workers grew by 7.6% over the previous year. 

Figure 1 – PSEA population by tenure and year

Figure 1 – PSEA population by tenure and year

Figure 1 long description

Source: PSC population files

*Canada Border Services Agency

5.3 Notable growth, contributing to the 4.1% year-over-year population increase, occurred in the Canada Border Services Agency, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada [due mainly to the growth experienced by Passport Canada (33%)], Correctional Service Canada and Health Canada. Please see Table 44 within Appendix 4 for a detailed listing of departments and agencies population changes from March 2007 to March 2008.

5.4 The number of indeterminate, term and casual employees in the National Capital Region increased to 82 875, up from 78 818 employees the year before. This is an increase of 5.1%.

5.5 Overall public service hiring and staffing activities – Organizations conducted 122 093 staffing actions during 2007-2008, of which 89 197 were appointments to or within the public service (73 106 indeterminate and 16 091 specified term), 13 600 were students and an additional 19 296 were casual workers (Figure 2). This represented a 9.4% increase in staffing activity over the previous fiscal year.

Figure 2 – Overall public service hiring and staffing activities*

Figure 2 – Overall public service hiring and staffing activities*

Figure 2 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*Please see technical notes, Table 35 within Appendix 4.

5.6 Hiring activity to the public service by geographic area – Hiring activity to public service positions across the country during 2007-2008 totalled 54 734. Of these, 21 838 were to indeterminate and specified term positions, 19 296 were casual workers and 13 600 were students. Figure 3 shows the distribution of this hiring activity by geographic area.

Figure 3 – Hiring activity to the public service by geographic area compared to the population as of March 31, 2008*

Figure 3 – ­Hiring activity to the public service by geographic area compared to the population as of March 31, 2008*

Figure 3 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files and population files

*Totals include indeterminate, specified term, casual and student hiring activity to the public service and population.

5.7 Hiring activity within and outside the National Capital Region, compared to the population as of March 2008 – Approximately 43% of this hiring activity (23 352 out of 54 734) in 2007-2008 was to positions located in the National Capital Region (NCR). Figure 4 shows that the proportion of the public service hiring activity (indeterminate, specified term, casual and students) within the NCR has remained relatively stable over the past five years despite an increase in absolute numbers.  The proportion of hiring activity is consistent with the public service employee population distribution as of March 31, 2008.

Figure 4 – Hiring activity inside and outside the National Capital Region, compared to the population as of March 31, 2008

Figure 4 – Hiring activity inside and outside the National Capital Region, compared to the population as of March 31, 2008

Figure 4 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files and PSC population files

5.8 Sixty-five percent of indeterminate and term appointments to the public service were in two occupational categories; Administrative and Foreign Service (7 546) and Administrative Support (6 649). Three groups within these two occupational categories accounted for over 50% of the appointments to the public service: CR (6 530), PM (3 007) and AS (1 824).

5.9 The average age of indeterminate and term appointees to the public service was 36 (35 for women and 36 for men). Women outnumbered men, accounting for 57% of these appointments. Seventy-one percent of these appointees listed English as their first official language while 29% listed French.

5.10 Executive Group – As of March 31, 2008, 4 357 individuals occupied indeterminate or specified term positions in the EX Group (EX-1 to EX-5) in PSEA organizations, an increase of 5.7% (236) from the year before. This represents an increase for a third consecutive year.

  • Of the five levels in the EX group, the population at the EX-4 level has increased the most, proportionally, over the previous year, from 172 to 195 employees (or 13.4%). The number of individuals at the EX-5 level dropped by 3 persons (-3.7%) over the same period.
  • The EX-1 level continues to be the largest group, comprising 52.3% (2 278) of the total EX population. As of March 31, 2008, the EX-1 level population had grown by 134 (6.3%) over the previous year and by 306 (15.5%) since March 2004. In comparison, the number of public servants occupying an indeterminate or a specified term position in PSEA organizations increased by 4.1% and by 12.9%, respectively, over the same periods.
Table 3 - Population of EX group by level and fiscal year
Level March 2004 March 2005 March 2006 March 2007 March 2008
EX-1 1 972 1 977 1 999 2 144 2 278
EX-2 947 892 920 996 1 072
EX-3 674 682 733 728 734
EX-4 173 177 177 172 195
EX-5 77 71 81 81 78
Total 3 843 3 799 3 910 4 121 4 357

Source: PSC population files

Note: Totals include indeterminate and specified terms in PSEA organizations.

5.11 EX staffing activities by fiscal year and level – The total number of staffing activities in the EX group rose steadily over the last five years, from 1 731 in 2003-2004 to 2 345 in 2007-2008. This represents an increase of 35.5% (614). A total of 2 345 EX staffing activities in 2007-2008 (including appointments to the public service, promotions, lateral and downward movements and acting appointments) represented an increase of 3.5% over the previous year.

  • In 2007-2008, more than half (54.6%) of the staffing activities within the EX group were concentrated in the EX-1 level positions, a rate comparable to that of the last five years.
  • The number of staffing activities at the EX 5-level has dropped 22.7% from last year, going from 44 in 2006-2007 to 34 in 2007-2008.

Figure 5 – EX staffing activities by fiscal year and level

Figure 5 – EX staffing activities by fiscal year and level

Figure 5 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

5.12 In 2007-2008, there were 790 EX acting appointments greater than four months, made across the public service. This is an increase of 3% over the previous year; however, the increase in acting appointments is comparable to the increase in the total number of EX appointments (3.5%). The number of promotions within the EX group increased by 94 in 2007-2008, or 11% over the previous year.

Table 4 - Promotions and acting appointments to and within the EX group by fiscal year
Activity 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 % increase
(over last year)
TOTAL EX appointments 1 731 1 781 2 038 2 265  2 345 3.5%
Promotions 600 466 677 856 950 11.0%
Acting appointments  572 673 754* 767 790 3.0%

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*The 2005-2006 Annual Report incorrectly noted 752 acting appointments for 2005-2006.

5.13 In 2007-2008, 1 653 of the 2 345 appointments to or within the EX group (70.5%) were "bilingual imperative". This means that candidates must meet the language requirements of the position when they accept the offer. The steady increase seen over the last five years may be a result of the Treasury Board Directive on the Staffing of Bilingual Positions which came into effect in April 2004. (Refer to Table 5) Among all five levels of the EX group, the EX-5 had the highest percentage of bilingual imperative appointments, with 30 out of 34 appointments in 2007-2008, or 88.2%.

Table 5 - Number and percentage of bilingual imperative appointments to and within the EX group, by level and fiscal year
  2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008
No. %* No. %* No. %* No. %* No. %*
EX-1 517 54.5 559 58.6 674 65.4 865 65.6 880 68.8
EX-2 211 52.0 273 64.5 338 64.6 363 69.5 418 72.6
EX-3 158 62.2 198 66.0 284 79.3 240 79.5 245 70.8
EX-4 63 72.4 59 67.8 60 72.3 68 85.0 80 73.4
EX-5 27 75.0 14 82.4 35 81.4 38 86.3 30 88.2
Sub-total
bilingual
imperative
appointments
976 56.3 1 103 61.9 1 391 68.2 1 574 69.5 1 653 70.5
TOTAL EX
appointments
1 731 1 781 2 038 2 265 2 345

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*Percentages are calculated on the total EX appointments by level.

5.14 Official languages – PSC statistics demonstrate that there are many opportunities for unilingual and bilingual Canadians to join the public service. Figures 6-9 indicate the number of appointments staffed by the language requirements of the position.

Figure 6 – Appointments to the public service by language requirements of position, 2007-2008*

Figure 6 – ­Appointments to the public service by language requirements of position, 2007-2008*

Figure 6 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*Please see technical notes, Table 41 within Appendix 4.

5.15 Appointments to the public service by first official language – PSC statistics also demonstrate that there are significant opportunities for both Anglophone and Francophone Canadians. In 2007-2008, 70.6% of persons appointed to the public service indicated English as their first official language, whereas 29.4% indicated French. These percentages have remained relatively unchanged over the past five years.

Figure 7 – Appointments to the public service by first official language group*

Figure 7 – ­Appointments to the public service by first official language group*

Figure 7 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*Please see technical notes, Table 41 within Appendix 4.

5.16 Appointments to the public service by first official language group for bilingual imperative positions only – The number of Anglophones and Francophones being appointed to bilingual imperative positions to the public service has also remained stable, with 36.2% of the appointees being of Anglophone and 63.8% being of Francophone.

Figure 8 – Appointments to the public service by first official language group for bilingual imperative appointments only*

Figure 8 – Appointments to the public service by first official language group for bilingual imperative appointments only*

Figure 8 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*Please see technical notes, Table 41 within Appendix 4.

5.17 Public Service Official Languages Exclusion Approval Order – Under the Treasury Board Directive on the Staffing of Bilingual Positions, positions may be staffed on a non-imperative basis under specific circumstances. The Public Service Official Languages Exclusion Approval Order (PSOLEAO, or Order) is the regulatory instrument whereby a public servant may be exempted for up to two years from the obligation to meet the language requirements of their position, if it was staffed on a
non-imperative basis.

5.18 This initial exemption period may be extended for the reasons set out in the Public Service Official Languages Appointment Regulations (the Regulations). Note that official language proficiency is an essential qualification.

5.19 Of the 57 836 indeterminate appointments made to and within the public service in 2007-2008 (excludes acting appointments), 2 054 were appointments resulting from a bilingual non-imperative process. The Order applies to 320 of these appointments for which the incumbents did not meet the language requirements of their positions at the time of appointment. These incumbents are entitled to language training and must meet the language requirements within two years.

Figure 9 – Appointments to the public service and staffing activities within the public service, by language requirements of position, for indeterminate only 2007-2008*

Figure 9 – ­Appointments to the public service and staffing activities within the public service, by language requirements of position, for indeterminate only 2007-2008*

Figure 9 long description

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files

*Please see technical notes, Table 41 within Appendix 4. Excludes acting appointments.

5.20 The number of non-imperative appointments to positions whose incumbents are required to meet the language requirements has been falling steadily for the last five years. On the other hand, the proportion of public servants not meeting the language requirements of their position, upon appointment, has remained essentially the same (see Table 6).

Table 6 - Number of employees exempted under the PSOLEAO
Fiscal year Indeterminate appointments to bilingual positions Non-imperative appointments (% of bilingual positions) Employees not meeting the requirements upon appointment (% of non-imperativeappointments)
2003-2004 17 786 3 848 (22%) 523 (14%)
2004-2005 16 029 2 768 (17%) 454 (16%)
2005-2006 19 793 2 180 (11%) 308 (14%)
2006-2007 22 744 2 294 (10%) 354 (15%)
2007-2008 26 182 2 054 (8%) 320 (16%)

Source: PSC hiring and staffing activities files, excluding acting appointments

5.21 Each year, organizations are required to report situations in which employees who were appointed on a non-imperative basis still do not meet the language requirements of their position after the expiry of the initial two-year exemption period. On March 31, 2008, there were 402 employees whose initial two-year period had expired and who did not meet the language requirements of their position.

5.22 Trend towards compliance – If an exemption expires before the incumbent meets the language requirements of their position, it must be extended in accordance with the provisions of the Order. In the past, we have noted that organizations do not always ensure that exemptions are extended to keep them compliant with the provisions of the Order. Since March 31, 2005, a steady decrease has been noted in the number of cases exceeding two years that are not compliant with the Order or its Regulations. On March 31, 2008, there were 156 such cases, whereas on March 31, 2005 there were 892. The reduction in the number of cases is attributed to the PSC’s monitoring and constant efforts to enhance organizations’ awareness.

Figure 10 – Number of non-compliant situations as of March 31 of each year

Figure 10 – Number of non-compliant situations as of March 31 of each year

Figure 10 long description

Source: PSC files on official languages

5.23 Harmonization of the two Orders – In 2005, the PSC revised the 1981 PSOLEAO (the Order), under which, at the discretion of the PSC or an authorized deputy head, the initial two-year exemption on a commitment to become bilingual could be extended. However, it did not specify the length or circumstances of such extensions.

5.24 The Order that has been in force since December 31, 2005 specifies that the total length of one or more extensions cannot exceed two additional years. The circumstances in which an extension is possible are set out in the Regulations.

5.25 To move towards greater uniformity for providing extensions, the PSC approved an approach aimed at harmonizing the application of the former 1981 Order with the spirit and intent of the current Order. In so doing, the PSC's goal is to ensure that any extensions granted under the previous Order follow the principles of the current one.

5.26 The PSC will be actively following cases in which the appointment took place under the former PSOLEAO and the incumbents still do not meet the linguistic requirements of their positions. To this end, the PSC will start monitoring the 184 cases reported by organizations for which the appointment took place four or more years ago. A list of these long-standing cases by organization can be found in Table 46 within Appendix 4. It is worth noting that currently these 184 long-standing cases represent nearly half (45.7%) of the 402 cases exceeding the initial two-years exemption period.